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Hodd author Adam Thorpe

That not only has he given himself up to apostasy and shame but that his ballads were responsible for turning a murderous felon into the most popular outlaw hero and folk legend of England Robin HoodWritten with his characteristic depth and subtlety his sure understanding of folklore his precise command of detail Adam Thorpe's ninth novel is both a thrilling re examination of myth and a moving reminder of how human innocence and frailty fix and harden into histo. Robin Hood is one of my favorite stories from when I was a kid to now So any book about him will draw me in Hodd does have a uniue way of telling this story The actual author Adam Thorpe writes it as an academic in the 1920 s translating on old medieval manuscript written by a monk telling his own story of meeting Robin Hood as a sort of autobiographyconfession So it s a real author writing as a fake one translating an imaginary document Got it So it s written in the first person in a weird mix of old English and modern and as it s an academic translation has footnotes explaining certain phrases I d say the way this is written is very awkward for me anyway It was hard to read easily where many times I had to re read sentences to get a proper grasp of it the footnotes also broke up the flow of reading making it very kind of stop start It didn t help with my reading experience The idea of the story is good though on how an elderly monk retells how he met Robin Hood when the monk was a teenager minstrel for a priest It say s how Robin Hood was of a heretic and this conflicting hard with the young boy s faith and general attitude at the time Giving Hood this crazy preacher air about him was nice touch with him leading of a robbing cult against the church than a bunch of rebels fighting against the king The story is supposed to be based on the oldest Robin Hood story Robin Hood and the Monk and this account was inspiration for it The main problem I have is that Robin Hood isn t in it enough More is spent of the childhood of the monk talking about as a boy he was taught by a crazy hermit living in cave Robin Hood is barely in a third of the book In a book called Hodd about Robin Hood I want than that especially as this preaching insane heretic does seem a compelling character The narrator of the story was nicknamed Moche Latin for adventure and was a minstrel so Moche the Minstrel became Much the Miller s son which I guess is clever But the whole idea of the book comes across as being a bit too clever the old style of English the use of Latin the footnotes and constantly using different mis spelling of words I get it that there was no dictionary or correct spelling then but still The story end s uickly with no real mention let alone Robin Hood being there The story is much about Moche and his inner conflict between his religious teachings and Hood s heresy of there being no sin So calling it Hodd seems a bit of a cheat as the while the parts with Robin s gang are a bit exciting this is only a small part of the book While a different way of telling a story and some of the footnotes about medieval words and customs were interesting the way it s written and the leaving Robin Hood out for so much yet having some much about the hermit in the cave made it of a slog than an enjoyable readIf you re looking for an exciting book about Robin Hood I d suggest Outlaw by Angus Donald In some ways there a bit similar on Robin Hood s character but Outlaw is just fun of a read while Hodd is of an interesting way of reading Cock Tales responsible for turning a murderous felon into the most popular outlaw hero and folk legend of England Robin HoodWritten with his characteristic depth and subtlety his sure understanding of folklore his precise command of detail Adam Thorpe's ninth novel is both a thrilling Son of the Hero re examination of myth and a moving The Alien Jigsaw reminder of how human innocence and frailty fix and harden into histo. Robin Hood is one of my favorite stories from when I was a kid to now So any book about him will draw me in Hodd does have a uniue way of telling this story The actual author Adam Thorpe writes it as an academic in the 1920 s translating on old medieval manuscript written by a monk telling his own story of meeting Robin Hood as a sort of autobiographyconfession So it s a Towards a Comprehensive Theory of Human Learning real author writing as a fake one translating an imaginary document Got it So it s written in the first person in a weird mix of old English and modern and as it s an academic translation has footnotes explaining certain phrases I d say the way this is written is very awkward for me anyway It was hard to The Illusion of Gods Presence read easily where many times I had to Folk Tales From The Soviet Union re Not The Hot Chick read sentences to get a proper grasp of it the footnotes also broke up the flow of Pegged and Plugged at the Club reading making it very kind of stop start It didn t help with my Tunnel Through Time reading experience The idea of the story is good though on how an elderly monk Game of Bimbofication, Part 3 retells how he met Robin Hood when the monk was a teenager minstrel for a priest It say s how Robin Hood was of a heretic and this conflicting hard with the young boy s faith and general attitude at the time Giving Hood this crazy preacher air about him was nice touch with him leading of a Game of Bimbofication, Part 2 robbing cult against the church than a bunch of Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, Vol. 1 of 5 rebels fighting against the king The story is supposed to be based on the oldest Robin Hood story Robin Hood and the Monk and this account was inspiration for it The main problem I have is that Robin Hood isn t in it enough More is spent of the childhood of the monk talking about as a boy he was taught by a crazy hermit living in cave Robin Hood is barely in a third of the book In a book called Hodd about Robin Hood I want than that especially as this preaching insane heretic does seem a compelling character The narrator of the story was nicknamed Moche Latin for adventure and was a minstrel so Moche the Minstrel became Much the Miller s son which I guess is clever But the whole idea of the book comes across as being a bit too clever the old style of English the use of Latin the footnotes and constantly using different mis spelling of words I get it that there was no dictionary or correct spelling then but still The story end s uickly with no The Fatima Century real mention let alone Robin Hood being there The story is much about Moche and his inner conflict between his Leah Starrs Revenge religious teachings and Hood s heresy of there being no sin So calling it Hodd seems a bit of a cheat as the while the parts with Robin s gang are a bit exciting this is only a small part of the book While a different way of telling a story and some of the footnotes about medieval words and customs were interesting the way it s written and the leaving Robin Hood out for so much yet having some much about the hermit in the cave made it of a slog than an enjoyable Pieces 8 (Pieces, readIf you Time Flies and Other Short Plays re looking for an exciting book about Robin Hood I d suggest Outlaw by Angus Donald In some ways there a bit similar on Robin Hood s character but Outlaw is just fun of a Fall (VIP Book 3) (English Edition) read while Hodd is of an interesting way of Drawing Dead (Faolan OConnor Book 1) reading

download ↠ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ä Adam Thorpe

Document rescued from a ruined church on the Somme and translated from the original Latin The testimony of an anonymous monk it describes his time as a boy in the greenwood with a half crazed bandit called Robert Hodd who following the thirteenth century principles of the 'heresy of the Free Spirit' believes himself above God and beyond sin Hodd and his crimes would have been forgotten without the boy's minstrel skills and it is the old monk's cruel fate to know. When I started this book I was confused for a minute I thought the book was historical fiction a retelling of the Robin Hood myth If so who then was this Francis Belloes and how come there where tons of footnotes Of course this is the central conceit of the novel it is a translation by the aforementioned Francis Belloes of a far older manuscript This manuscript is the autobiography of the monk mentioned in the blurb So it is historical fiction just done in a very clever wayBefore getting to the meat of the novel I want to focus on the framework for a bit This framework consists of the translator s preface and the footnotes I really thought these were well done They made this book not just a historical novel of medieval times but of World War I too And the further the novel progresses the WWI intrudes into it through comments inserted into the footnotes by Belloes The footnotes were the main reason I was confused at first I looked some of them up and they all came out as existing titles some of them even available from the library where I work The amount of work that must have gone into researching not just Robin Hood and the medieval life but into pre Interbellum publications on Robin Hood related texts and also WWI soldiers is mind bogglingThe story of Hodd isn t so much about Robin Hood as much as it is about how the legend of Robin Hood was born The novel s narrator a monk whose real name we never learn was a minstrel before taking the cloth and through circumstance ends up part of Hodd s gang The novel is divided in four parts much as our monk s life was influenced by four masters Only three masters are explicitly named the hermit Brother Thomas and Hodd but one could name the Church as his final master under whose guidance he spent most of his days Interspersed into the story of the monk s time as Muche in Hodd s band are his recollections of his previous masters There are also some theological contemplations though never to excess as Belloes has excised the largest part of these The recollections provide an explanation of why he fell in with Hodd They show how the monk felt himself superseded as first in his masters affections by new boys and feared abandonment Hodd first makes him his first disciple and this lure proves too much for MucheWhile religion figures greatly in the story it never becomes preachy The religious outlook of the main character isn t just due to his vocation as a monk in the Middle Ages religion was the linchpin of most people s existence The book also shows the long overlap between Christianity and paganism in medieval times and the way people were still searching for what Christianity was exactly resulting in various heresies some of which are referenced in the book s footnotesAt the end of the book the monk has come full circle and we ve seen the birth of the Robin Hood saga as we know it I truly enjoyed this book While not a fast read despite its slim 305 pages it s an engrossing one It s a fascinating look at how history can become legend and at the Middle Ages in all their rough bleak glory Blackmailed By Daddy rescued from a उरलं सुरलं [Urla Surla] ruined church on the Somme and translated from the original Latin The testimony of an anonymous monk it describes his time as a boy in the greenwood with a half crazed bandit called Robert Hodd who following the thirteenth century principles of the 'heresy of the Free Spirit' believes himself above God and beyond sin Hodd and his crimes would have been forgotten without the boy's minstrel skills and it is the old monk's cruel fate to know. When I started this book I was confused for a minute I thought the book was historical fiction a Cock Tales retelling of the Robin Hood myth If so who then was this Francis Belloes and how come there where tons of footnotes Of course this is the central conceit of the novel it is a translation by the aforementioned Francis Belloes of a far older manuscript This manuscript is the autobiography of the monk mentioned in the blurb So it is historical fiction just done in a very clever wayBefore getting to the meat of the novel I want to focus on the framework for a bit This framework consists of the translator s preface and the footnotes I Son of the Hero really thought these were well done They made this book not just a historical novel of medieval times but of World War I too And the further the novel progresses the WWI intrudes into it through comments inserted into the footnotes by Belloes The footnotes were the main The Alien Jigsaw reason I was confused at first I looked some of them up and they all came out as existing titles some of them even available from the library where I work The amount of work that must have gone into Towards a Comprehensive Theory of Human Learning researching not just Robin Hood and the medieval life but into pre Interbellum publications on Robin Hood The Illusion of Gods Presence related texts and also WWI soldiers is mind bogglingThe story of Hodd isn t so much about Robin Hood as much as it is about how the legend of Robin Hood was born The novel s narrator a monk whose Folk Tales From The Soviet Union real name we never learn was a minstrel before taking the cloth and through circumstance ends up part of Hodd s gang The novel is divided in four parts much as our monk s life was influenced by four masters Only three masters are explicitly named the hermit Brother Thomas and Hodd but one could name the Church as his final master under whose guidance he spent most of his days Interspersed into the story of the monk s time as Muche in Hodd s band are his Not The Hot Chick recollections of his previous masters There are also some theological contemplations though never to excess as Belloes has excised the largest part of these The Pegged and Plugged at the Club recollections provide an explanation of why he fell in with Hodd They show how the monk felt himself superseded as first in his masters affections by new boys and feared abandonment Hodd first makes him his first disciple and this lure proves too much for MucheWhile Tunnel Through Time religion figures greatly in the story it never becomes preachy The Game of Bimbofication, Part 3 religious outlook of the main character isn t just due to his vocation as a monk in the Middle Ages Game of Bimbofication, Part 2 religion was the linchpin of most people s existence The book also shows the long overlap between Christianity and paganism in medieval times and the way people were still searching for what Christianity was exactly Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, Vol. 1 of 5 resulting in various heresies some of which are The Fatima Century referenced in the book s footnotesAt the end of the book the monk has come full circle and we ve seen the birth of the Robin Hood saga as we know it I truly enjoyed this book While not a fast Leah Starrs Revenge read despite its slim 305 pages it s an engrossing one It s a fascinating look at how history can become legend and at the Middle Ages in all their Pieces 8 (Pieces, rough bleak glory

Adam Thorpe Ä 3 characters

Who was Robin Hood Romantic legend casts him as outlaw archer and hero of the people living in Sherwood Forest with Friar Tuck Little John and Maid Marian stealing from the rich to give to the poor but there is no historical proof to back this up The early ballads portray a uite different figure impulsive violent vengeful with no concern for the needy no merry band and no Maid Marian Hodd provides a possible answer to this famous uestion in the form of a medieval. This tale presents a postmodern hyperbolical Robin Hood who actually looks realistic enough very different from the mythical hero we are all familiar withThe story is told in 1305 by a 90 year old monk who spent a year in his company initially against his will in 1225 during the minority of king Henry IIIHood called Hodd Hode Hodde in the text is described as being then a guy handsome enough until he spoke then his mouth moving in a curious way over uneven teeth it seemed as though its lips were sucking on a plum or a sloe not forming words His eyebrows were thick and dark meeting in the middle beneath a blemish of the skin and the balls in his sockets were as if swollen Hood is in the habit of cursing priests the institution of the church the political system of his day all kinds of authorities and offices his philosophy is a mix of half baked pantheism of mystical and anarchist beliefs behaving usually as someone we would call today a uack of fake He is highly addicted to hallucinogens mushrooms and commands over a large group of hardened outlaws and felons who form a kind of a community or mini state in the middle of the forest not far from Nottingham robbing assaulting andor killing any travelers who happen to pass by the neighboring roads

  • Hardcover
  • 309
  • Hodd author Adam Thorpe
  • Adam Thorpe
  • English
  • 01 November 2019
  • 9780224079433

About the Author: Adam Thorpe

Adam Thorpe is a British poet novelist and playwright whose works also include short stories and radio dramasAdam Thorpe was born in Paris and grew up in India Cameroon and England Graduating from Magdalen College Oxford in 1979 he founded a touring theatre company then settled in London to teach drama and English literatureHis first collection of poetry Mornings in the Baltic 1988 w



10 thoughts on “Hodd author Adam Thorpe

  1. says:

    As difficult a novel as I've finished in a long time but also a marvel of sustained and disciplined imagination

  2. says:

    “The seas are folded over us above our heads the lower sea becoming the upper sea and yet still blue when not girt with sea mist which is grey and melancholy Some men when they look up see birds but I see only a kind of fish sometimes in great shoals These fish are beaked and feathered”So begins the true tale of Robyn Hodd recounted by an aged monk of Whitby whose forgotten Latin manuscript is rescued from

  3. says:

    This tale presents a postmodern hyperbolical Robin Hood who actually looks realistic enough very different from the mythical hero we are all familiar withThe story is told in 1305 by a 90 year old monk who spent a year in his company initially against his will in 1225 during the minority of king Henry IIIHood called Hod

  4. says:

    When I started this book I was confused for a minute I thought the book was historical fiction a retelling of the Robin Hood myth If so who then was this Francis Belloes and how come there where tons of footnotes? Of course this is the central

  5. says:

    I have yet to have a book that I have not finished reading Hodd threatened to be the first The original thought of a book

  6. says:

    I really enjoyed this although I found it difficult to follow in parts due to the footnotesA really fascinating way to tell a story and full of vivid imagery and connections with nature and death So realistic and descriptive of life in the middle ages I felt like I should wash my hands after reading And a surprisingly satisfying end too

  7. says:

    Pretty good book in an interesting era with an interesting perspective but some of the descriptive language does go on a bit

  8. says:

    This wasn't an easy read and I didn't always enjoy it but the overall imaginative concept was awesome and that's what I remember it for most of all

  9. says:

    Robin Hood is one of my favorite stories from when I was a kid to now So any book about him will draw me in Hodd does have a uniue way of telling this story The actual author Adam Thorpe writes it as an academic in the 1920’s translating on old medieval manuscript written by a monk telling his own story of meeting Robin Hood as a sort of a

  10. says:

    As the rediscovered printer's proof of a translation of a lost copy of an original Thirteenth Century manuscript this novel presents with over 400 scholarly footnotes as well as mediaeval marginalia and Latin apparatus criticus what is claimed to be the earliest historical record of the brutal felon later know

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