[PDF/EBOOK] Nightwood ✓ Djuna Barnes – PDF & eBook



10 thoughts on “Nightwood

  1. says:

    Nightwood is the sound of hearts breaking written on the page spread out for all to see five lives five people eviscerated and eviscerating each other These people fucking kill me they are so sad and so full of nonsense and so determined to live in their own personal little boxes striving for epiphanies that th

  2. says:

    ”’You know what man really desires?’ inuired the doctor grinning into the immobile face of the Baron ‘One of two things to find someone who is so stupid that he can lie to her or to love someone so much that she can lie to hi

  3. says:

    Rating 175 of fiveThe Publisher Says Nightwood Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch TLS That time is the period between the two World Wars and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities Paris Berlin and Vienna—a world in which the boundaries of class religion and sexuality are bold but surprisingly por

  4. says:

    From the start an overwhelming sense of dread and despair pervades Nightwood Barnes alternates between entrancing readers with the novel’s ethereal prose and jerking them awake with moments of unspeakable torment In spit

  5. says:

    Passing in ParisTo Pass; verb intransitive to be accepted as being something that you are not esp something better or attractive Marion looks so young she could pass for 30Do this jacket and skirt match well enough to pass as a suit? Cambridge English Dictionary “Love that terrible thing” says one of Barnes’s characters Terrible because the demand of love is the voluntary loss of oneself To make oneself lovable it is necessary to st

  6. says:

    The novel that almost ended my book club We'd previously read work by Robert Coover Anne Carson and Ben Marcus Cormac McCarthy's Suttree and The Story of O But it was Nightwood that most of the usually intrepid group didn't bother to finish a few unwilling to even venture past the first chapter Bitter complaints of overly baroue language old fashioned concerns with ancestry and a story where nothing happened Folks were pissed T

  7. says:

    499995It is wise of me to mention that from here on out I have no idea what I'm talking about Which admittedly is the usual truth of the matter concerning these reviews but this book in particular makes me give a damn about how much knowledge did not or has not yet trickled down and damned up in my mind Not enough to get m

  8. says:

    I am a fan of experimental literature since first experiencing the fun rides I got from Postmodernist novels of Barth Vonnegut and Pynchon in my college days in the early 70s I recently set out to give myself a

  9. says:

    Many of the reviews of Nightwood on this website seem to reflect the same sentiment 'how do I even review this?' I often think this is a bit of a cop out review but in the case of Djuna Barnes' Modernist novel from 1936 utter disorientation seems to be the most fitting responseA novel generally follows a basic plot with some semb

  10. says:

    I still see far too freuently folks adding the Truncated Nightwood to their reading The one slashed up by Eliot in order to get it past the Uptight Folks If you want Barnes as Barnes wrote herself you'll have to do better than a slim cheap pb even if it is a New Directions And it's easy enough to do with this beautiful OUT OF PRINT Dalkey ed by Cheryl J PlumbIf you're interested in the controversies about BA

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Summary Æ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ¹ Djuna Barnes

Aris Berlin and Vienna a world in which the boundaries of class religion and sexuality are bold but surprisingly porous The outsized characters who inhabit this world are some of the most memorable in all of fiction Barnes' depiction of these characters and their relationships Nora says A man is another person a woman is yourself caught as you turn in panic; on her mouth you kiss your own has made the novel a landmark of feminist and lesbian litera. The novel that almost ended my book club We d previously read work by Robert Coover Anne Carson and Ben Marcus Cormac McCarthy s Suttree and The Story of O But it was Nightwood that most of the usually intrepid group didn t bother to finish a few unwilling to even venture past the first chapter Bitter complaints of overly baroue language old fashioned concerns with ancestry and a story where nothing happened Folks were pissed To be honest I m still mystified While it took me far longer to read this 180 page novel than I d anticipated the prose demanded an attentive slowness as key moments often passed within a short phrase I felt rewarded every time I stopped to parse out a particularly knotty section or unpack an ambiguous aphorism There s a level of psychological insight into the characters here that s astounding coupled with Barnes setting an almost unknowable anti heroine at the dead center of the story serving as a sort of swirling black hole While at first the book seems to play like a series of portraits the cohesive structure slowly reveals itself This is a book that s reticent to shine a light on its secrets Even the very last scene seems to suggest a new meaning for everything that came before It forces you to reconsider where you ve been placing the dramatic emphasis and empathy It s a story where little might happen on the surface but there s simultaneously too much to take in on one reading The doctor s monologues ricochet around the page like indoor fireworks and it s hard to know whether to enjoy the explosions or duck for cover Under the restrained veneer of the descriptions Barnes documents a world of transexuals cruising defrocked priests drunken mothers who abandon their infants feral encounters with animals etc It s often incredibly debauched without being the least bit judgmental of its characters And of course it s a love story It s about a love for oblivion that oblivion you can sometimes find in other people Beyond the Pale usually intrepid group didn t bother to finish a few The Black Ice Score (Parker, unwilling to even venture past the first chapter Bitter complaints of overly baroue language old fashioned concerns with ancestry and a story where nothing happened Folks were pissed To be honest I m still mystified While it took me far longer to read this 180 page novel than I d anticipated the prose demanded an attentive slowness as key moments often passed within a short phrase I felt rewarded every time I stopped to parse out a particularly knotty section or The Black Painting unpack an ambiguous aphorism There s a level of psychological insight into the characters here that s astounding coupled with Barnes setting an almost Fire and Desire unknowable anti heroine at the dead center of the story serving as a sort of swirling black hole While at first the book seems to play like a series of portraits the cohesive structure slowly reveals itself This is a book that s reticent to shine a light on its secrets Even the very last scene seems to suggest a new meaning for everything that came before It forces you to reconsider where you ve been placing the dramatic emphasis and empathy It s a story where little might happen on the surface but there s simultaneously too much to take in on one reading The doctor s monologues ricochet around the page like indoor fireworks and it s hard to know whether to enjoy the explosions or duck for cover Under the restrained veneer of the descriptions Barnes documents a world of transexuals cruising defrocked priests drunken mothers who abandon their infants feral encounters with animals etc It s often incredibly debauched without being the least bit judgmental of its characters And of course it s a love story It s about a love for oblivion that oblivion you can sometimes find in other people

Read Nightwood

Nightwood

TureMost striking of all is Barnes' unparalleled stylistic innovation which led T S Eliot to proclaim the book so good a novel that only sensibilities trained on poetry can wholly appreciate it Recognised as a twentieth century classic the influence of Djuna Barnes's novel has been and continues to be exceptionalNow with a new preface by Jeanette Winterson Nightwood still crackles with the same electric charge it had on its first publication in 193. Many of the reviews of Nightwood on this website seem to reflect the same sentiment how do I even review this I often think this is a bit of a cop out review but in the case of Djuna Barnes Modernist novel from 1936 utter disorientation seems to be the most fitting responseA novel generally follows a basic plot with some semblance of a structure and often has one main character Nightwood begins the birth of Baron Felix We learn about his false patronage and we follow him in his attempt to produce an heir Then we move on The book forgets about him and Robin Vote becomes the main character Then Doctor Matthew becomes the main character Then Nora becomes the main character Then it ends Also over half of this book isn t even narrative It s just the transsexual Irish gynaecologist Doctor Matthew O Connor talking about essentially nothing There is no plot There is no structure There is no one main character And yet Nightwood is totally immersive and highly readableWithin the genre of Modernist literature Nightwood is a relatively easy read Barnes doesn t resort to the stream of conciousness style that many of her fellow Modernists adopted Instead she relies on transgression This novel was one of the first in Western literature to portray a lesbian relationship Also our pseudo narrator Dr Matthew is openly transsexual But these were the days before WWII when the Weimar era was flourishing in Germany and the rest of Europe was following suit This novel is set in bohemian Paris during the rein of Gertrude Stein It presents an almost unbelievable oasis of decadence and liberality that genuinely did exist before Nazism ended it all That is the bittersweetness of reading the flamboyant novels of this era we have the foresight of history and we know how it s all going to end eventually Nightwood is a fabulous little novel It is not hard to believe why Dylan Thomas TS Eliot and William S Burroughs all believed it to be one of the greatest novels ever written It also recently appeared on the list of Greta Gerwig s ten favourite books which was the catalyst for my reading it as I bow down at the heels of Gerwig I would also suggest that this book would be a good starting place for those of you who want to dip your toes into the world of Modernist literature Believe me it s a lot safer than my tragic attempt to read Woolf s The Waves unassisted Beyond the Pale unparalleled stylistic innovation which led T S Eliot to proclaim the book so good a novel that only sensibilities trained on poetry can wholly appreciate it Recognised as a twentieth century classic the influence of Djuna Barnes's novel has been and continues to be exceptionalNow with a new preface by Jeanette Winterson Nightwood still crackles with the same electric charge it had on its first publication in 193. Many of the reviews of Nightwood on this website seem to reflect the same sentiment how do I even review this I often think this is a bit of a cop out review but in the case of Djuna Barnes Modernist novel from 1936 The Black Ice Score (Parker, utter disorientation seems to be the most fitting responseA novel generally follows a basic plot with some semblance of a structure and often has one main character Nightwood begins the birth of Baron Felix We learn about his false patronage and we follow him in his attempt to produce an heir Then we move on The book forgets about him and Robin Vote becomes the main character Then Doctor Matthew becomes the main character Then Nora becomes the main character Then it ends Also over half of this book isn t even narrative It s just the transsexual Irish gynaecologist Doctor Matthew O Connor talking about essentially nothing There is no plot There is no structure There is no one main character And yet Nightwood is totally immersive and highly readableWithin the genre of Modernist literature Nightwood is a relatively easy read Barnes doesn t resort to the stream of conciousness style that many of her fellow Modernists adopted Instead she relies on transgression This novel was one of the first in Western literature to portray a lesbian relationship Also our pseudo narrator Dr Matthew is openly transsexual But these were the days before WWII when the Weimar era was flourishing in Germany and the rest of Europe was following suit This novel is set in bohemian Paris during the rein of Gertrude Stein It presents an almost The Black Painting unbelievable oasis of decadence and liberality that genuinely did exist before Nazism ended it all That is the bittersweetness of reading the flamboyant novels of this era we have the foresight of history and we know how it s all going to end eventually Nightwood is a fabulous little novel It is not hard to believe why Dylan Thomas TS Eliot and William S Burroughs all believed it to be one of the greatest novels ever written It also recently appeared on the list of Greta Gerwig s ten favourite books which was the catalyst for my reading it as I bow down at the heels of Gerwig I would also suggest that this book would be a good starting place for those of you who want to dip your toes into the world of Modernist literature Believe me it s a lot safer than my tragic attempt to read Woolf s The Waves Fire and Desire unassisted

Summary Æ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ¹ Djuna Barnes

Barnes told a friend that Nightwood was written with her own blood 'while it was still running' That flowing wound was the breakup of an eight year relationship with the love of her lifeNightwood Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch TLS That time is the period between the two World Wars and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities P. Nightwood is the sound of hearts breaking written on the page spread out for all to see five lives five people eviscerated and eviscerating each other These people fucking kill me they are so sad and so full of nonsense and so determined to live in their own personal little boxes striving for epiphanies that they barely even understand trying to be a certain idea of What a Person Is Is that what I m like Maybe that s what everyone is like Barnes lays out these characters lives like beads on a string one after the other Baron Felix that whole fake heritage made by his father that he now lives out as if it were real I can t help but identify a little bit with the Baron his bullshit his need to please to be calm and careful as a way to prop himself up His stiffness Not really sure how Barnes feels about him she spends a lot of time with him such an elaborate backstory so that s something although I hate all the derogatory Jew crap Jews are like this Jews always think this way bogus and the only thing that is boring in Nightwood She creates this hollow man and then she fills him up with life and sadness and a rigid sort of sweetness towards his son I see myself in him and other people I know my dad especially Barnes seems interested in the Robin Nora Jenny triangle Makes sense I m interested in them too Robin Vote That name Is it supposed to mean something She is like something out of a Duras novel a hollow vessel an intellectual kind of id a sick need to define herself by rejecting those who want her rejecting those who want to define her I see a lot of myself in Robin that fucked up need to keep people at a distance no real connection means no proprietary relationship let s just be friends friends are easy I love my friends Except Robin has no real love in her just a blind mindless need for what Something When we first meet her she is passed out insensible Barnes describes her as La Somnambule a sleepwalker in life except sleepwalkers don t destroy She is like an exterminating angel a sleepy one In the end confronting a dog she is transformed into a kind of dog herself I think that s unfair to dogs My sympathies are mainly with Nora Flood a tough dyke of the old school a listener a person people gravitate towards to tell their stories to be listened to and so given a kind of identity by that listening being made human by being seen as human by another human I see a lot of myself in Nora There is a remoteness to her different than the alien uality of Robin s hollow vessel like a stillness a need to stay still and understand and truly see the world around her And then when she s hurt when she is filled with longing and damage and pain it is so debilitating and yet filled with such sad fury a painful howling fury I ve felt that it just takes over and you don t want to feel anything but pain your mind is just blank with it all bright and dark hues of hot angry red Poor Nora Why does her life become defined by her pursuit of Robin That s not even a life But it is a better life than Jenny Petheridge s life the third part of this strange sorrowful triangle Triangle Why do I keep saying that If you include Baron Felix it is of a suare But he barely counts in their lives his poor sad son becomes his life a son who is all need and reaching towards some kind of meaning something to define him I felt such empathy for that son like I was that son I am that son But back to Jenny Djuna Barnes must have based Jenny on someone she hates There is so much detail about her craziness And a lot of it is so funny a terrible kind of funny laughing at someone who is a rich basket case at a person who is basically a straw man woman for the author s hate She is all gruesome softness and blind stabby moments crying hysterics and desperate neediness such intensity and so little affect defining herself by creating these fake worlds to live in this dramatic love affair with an empty vessel not caring who she hurts shoving scratching her emotions right into onto a person s face literally And those who love her die her history of dead husbands leaving her better off and with of nothing I can t help but identify with Jenny with her weakness her desperate yearning I remember when my heart was broken except I was the one who did the breaking broke two hearts another person s heart isn t enough let s break mine too like Jenny with her insensible angry intrusive neediness her boring self abnegating self flagellating I hate all that How can a person like Jenny compete with a person like Nora how can Robin choose possession over true understanding Well that happens all the time I suppose And Robin doesn t really even choose her she chooses herself again and again I get Robin I see her in the mirror she s coming and going from and to nowhereAnd then the renegade doctor the berserk socialite Dr Matthew O Connor railing against form and tradition gentle and strong and angry and petty a drunkard a man who loves life a transvestite living in his little sualid apartment a man full of warmth and kindness and vitriol a man who secretly defines himself by helping others spitting out monologues about life and death and appearance and sanctity and desire He delivered Nora Flood into the world and is her sounding board his long rants are not just violent flows of sound and fury and pathos they are not merely self absorbed they are trying to speak to her by speaking of himself he is trying to break through to her by breaking himself down in front of her shaking her back to life away from insensibility and morbid obsession until the rant turns on the ranter and he in turn is broken down seeing himself and the world around him for what he and it truly is is becoming is falling back into His delirious rants are like the novel itself discretely separated into chapters separated by character and incident and yet the parts are flowing into each other the language flows into reality and out of it the narrative folds up into itself until it becomes unrecognizable as a narrative like a flower all mashed up so that the pulp is barely recognizable as the original flower just little parts here and there you pull a piece out and it is still a flower but what connection does it have to the original thing It turns in on itself it becomes something different and it stays essentially the same I see a lot of myself in Matthew O Connor him most of all most of all I Am Matthew O Connor I live and breathe him I read about these breaking hearts and they are all my heart too all of it none of it it all comes together it s all the same each separate one of them rightIs this a mobius strip of sorts UPDATElooking back on this a few weeks later i see that in my desperate attempt to write this review as a kind of stylistic homage to my favorite reviewer MARIEL i neglected key things that i usually like to put in my reviews okay here goesthe writing itself beautiful hypnotic excessive idiosyncratic modernist duh drily amusing rich with off kilter nuance flows like a bad dreamthe characterization despite the experimental nature of the novel and a regular use of caricature these are some amazingly three dimensional characters i got to understand them on a really human level and not just as uirky conceits on a pagethe narrative broken unstable constantly challenging and often very annoying as well annoying like sand in an oyster s shell Nightwood a pearl Burkes Christmas Surprise unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities P. Nightwood is the sound of hearts breaking written on the page spread out for all to see five lives five people eviscerated and eviscerating each other These people fucking kill me they are so sad and so full of nonsense and so determined to live in their own personal little boxes striving for epiphanies that they barely even A Perfect Blood (The Hollows, understand trying to be a certain idea of What a Person Is Is that what I m like Maybe that s what everyone is like Barnes lays out these characters lives like beads on a string one after the other Baron Felix that whole fake heritage made by his father that he now lives out as if it were real I can t help but identify a little bit with the Baron his bullshit his need to please to be calm and careful as a way to prop himself Just Wars and Moral Victories up His stiffness Not really sure how Barnes feels about him she spends a lot of time with him such an elaborate backstory so that s something although I hate all the derogatory Jew crap Jews are like this Jews always think this way bogus and the only thing that is boring in Nightwood She creates this hollow man and then she fills him Two Paradigms for Divine Healing up with life and sadness and a rigid sort of sweetness towards his son I see myself in him and other people I know my dad especially Barnes seems interested in the Robin Nora Jenny triangle Makes sense I m interested in them too Robin Vote That name Is it supposed to mean something She is like something out of a Duras novel a hollow vessel an intellectual kind of id a sick need to define herself by rejecting those who want her rejecting those who want to define her I see a lot of myself in Robin that fucked Kenget e Milosaos up need to keep people at a distance no real connection means no proprietary relationship let s just be friends friends are easy I love my friends Except Robin has no real love in her just a blind mindless need for what Something When we first meet her she is passed out insensible Barnes describes her as La Somnambule a sleepwalker in life except sleepwalkers don t destroy She is like an exterminating angel a sleepy one In the end confronting a dog she is transformed into a kind of dog herself I think that s Early Chinese Religion, Part Two (220-589 Ad) unfair to dogs My sympathies are mainly with Nora Flood a tough dyke of the old school a listener a person people gravitate towards to tell their stories to be listened to and so given a kind of identity by that listening being made human by being seen as human by another human I see a lot of myself in Nora There is a remoteness to her different than the alien At Europes Borders uality of Robin s hollow vessel like a stillness a need to stay still and We are the Ship understand and truly see the world around her And then when she s hurt when she is filled with longing and damage and pain it is so debilitating and yet filled with such sad fury a painful howling fury I ve felt that it just takes over and you don t want to feel anything but pain your mind is just blank with it all bright and dark hues of hot angry red Poor Nora Why does her life become defined by her pursuit of Robin That s not even a life But it is a better life than Jenny Petheridge s life the third part of this strange sorrowful triangle Triangle Why do I keep saying that If you include Baron Felix it is of a suare But he barely counts in their lives his poor sad son becomes his life a son who is all need and reaching towards some kind of meaning something to define him I felt such empathy for that son like I was that son I am that son But back to Jenny Djuna Barnes must have based Jenny on someone she hates There is so much detail about her craziness And a lot of it is so funny a terrible kind of funny laughing at someone who is a rich basket case at a person who is basically a straw man woman for the author s hate She is all gruesome softness and blind stabby moments crying hysterics and desperate neediness such intensity and so little affect defining herself by creating these fake worlds to live in this dramatic love affair with an empty vessel not caring who she hurts shoving scratching her emotions right into onto a person s face literally And those who love her die her history of dead husbands leaving her better off and with of nothing I can t help but identify with Jenny with her weakness her desperate yearning I remember when my heart was broken except I was the one who did the breaking broke two hearts another person s heart isn t enough let s break mine too like Jenny with her insensible angry intrusive neediness her boring self abnegating self flagellating I hate all that How can a person like Jenny compete with a person like Nora how can Robin choose possession over true Esoteric Buddhism at Dunhuang understanding Well that happens all the time I suppose And Robin doesn t really even choose her she chooses herself again and again I get Robin I see her in the mirror she s coming and going from and to nowhereAnd then the renegade doctor the berserk socialite Dr Matthew O Connor railing against form and tradition gentle and strong and angry and petty a drunkard a man who loves life a transvestite living in his little sualid apartment a man full of warmth and kindness and vitriol a man who secretly defines himself by helping others spitting out monologues about life and death and appearance and sanctity and desire He delivered Nora Flood into the world and is her sounding board his long rants are not just violent flows of sound and fury and pathos they are not merely self absorbed they are trying to speak to her by speaking of himself he is trying to break through to her by breaking himself down in front of her shaking her back to life away from insensibility and morbid obsession Studies on Steinschneider until the rant turns on the ranter and he in turn is broken down seeing himself and the world around him for what he and it truly is is becoming is falling back into His delirious rants are like the novel itself discretely separated into chapters separated by character and incident and yet the parts are flowing into each other the language flows into reality and out of it the narrative folds Fantasies of Cross-Dressing up into itself Commanders Little Surprise until it becomes The Holy Roman Empire, 1495-1806 unrecognizable as a narrative like a flower all mashed Come Hell or High Water up so that the pulp is barely recognizable as the original flower just little parts here and there you pull a piece out and it is still a flower but what connection does it have to the original thing It turns in on itself it becomes something different and it stays essentially the same I see a lot of myself in Matthew O Connor him most of all most of all I Am Matthew O Connor I live and breathe him I read about these breaking hearts and they are all my heart too all of it none of it it all comes together it s all the same each separate one of them rightIs this a mobius strip of sorts UPDATElooking back on this a few weeks later i see that in my desperate attempt to write this review as a kind of stylistic homage to my favorite reviewer MARIEL i neglected key things that i Selim III, Social Control and Policing in Istanbul at the End of the Eighteenth Century usually like to put in my reviews okay here goesthe writing itself beautiful hypnotic excessive idiosyncratic modernist duh drily amusing rich with off kilter nuance flows like a bad dreamthe characterization despite the experimental nature of the novel and a regular Propaganda Performed use of caricature these are some amazingly three dimensional characters i got to Hinterlands and Commodities understand them on a really human level and not just as Untold Secrets of Planet Earth uirky conceits on a pagethe narrative broken Apocalyptic Cartography unstable constantly challenging and often very annoying as well annoying like sand in an oyster s shell Nightwood a pearl