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Society is often talked about as a ladder from which you can climb from bottom to top The walls are less talked about This book is about how people try to get over them whether they manage to or notIn autumn 1992 growing up on a vast Birmingham estate the sixteen year old Lynsey Hanley went to sixth form college She knew that it would change her life but was entirely unprepared for the price she would h BOTWhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9Description Journalist Lynsey Hanley s personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decadesChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other where you have to rescind your old passport learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of your old life even if they are the relationships and things that are dearest to your heartClass is a subject we re all aware of but rarely talk about aside from the insidious line that we re all middle class now Hanley examines class aspiration and social mobility through the lens of her own life providing a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham and make her way against the odds through sixth form college university and on into the world of professional journalismReceived wisdom tells us social mobility is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society Yet changing class can be a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get onBlimey don t think I am going to become too involved with this anthropocentric subject yet the music it recalls is greatMel Kim RespectableThe Rolling Stones RespectableThis is My Truth Respectable in the 80s Respectable in the 90s Snakes and Ladders Her Husbands Christmas Bargain you can climb from bottom to top The walls are less talked about This book is about how people try to get over them whether they manage to or notIn autumn 1992 growing up on a vast Birmingham estate the sixteen The Geography of Witchcraft year old Lynsey Hanley went to sixth form college She knew that it would change her life but was entirely unprepared for the price she would h BOTWhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9Description Journalist Lynsey Hanley s personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decadesChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other where Hold On To Me you have to rescind Copping It Sweet (Murphys Law your old passport learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if Ill Be Yours for Christmas (Harlequin Blaze, you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of Her Babys Bodyguard (Eagle Squadron your old life even if they are the relationships and things that are dearest to If Wishes Were...Daddies your heartClass is a subject we re all aware of but rarely talk about aside from the insidious line that we re all middle class now Hanley examines class aspiration and social mobility through the lens of her own life providing a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham and make her way against the odds through sixth form college university and on into the world of professional journalismReceived wisdom tells us social mobility is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society Yet changing class can be a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get onBlimey don t think I am going to become too involved with this anthropocentric subject West of Heaven yet the music it recalls is greatMel Kim RespectableThe Rolling Stones RespectableThis is My Truth Respectable in the 80s Respectable in the 90s Snakes and Ladders

characters ¶ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Lynsey Hanley

Respectable

The world to another a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process of uprooting which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get on In this empathic wry and passionate exploration of class in Britain today Lynsey Hanley looks at how people are kept apart and keep themselves apart and the costs involved in the journey from 'there' to 'here' SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought provoking a great read I could not put it down

Lynsey Hanley ´ 5 review

Ave to pay to leave behind her working class world and become middle classClass remains resolutely with us as strongly as it did fifty years ago and with it the idea of aspiration of social mobility which received wisdom tells us is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society as a whole Yet for the many millions who experience it changing class is like emigrating from one side of From BBC radio 4 Book of the WeekJournalist Lynsey Hanley s personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades25 I can draw an outline of the landscape that shaped us with words such as Nice biscuits pornography underpasses 2p bus fares Hanley s childhood spanned the 1980s when she discovered early on the joys and consolations of music and gained political awareness by observing the ways in which different newspapers covered the Miners Strike 35 Growing up in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham she found school to be a mostly disappointing experience Instead she found solace in the local library and gained knowledge through the pages of music magazines and broadsheet newspapers 45 In this episode Hanley looks at the process of applying for university and of how many students make educational decisions based on their backgrounds old universities for the middle class new for the working class limiting potential advantages for the latter55 In this final episode she looks at the divisive notion encouraged by politicians of all parties over the past two decades that we re all middle class nowChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other where you have to rescind your old passport learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of your old life even if they are the relationships and things that are dearest to your heartClass is a subject we re all aware of but rarely talk about aside from the insidious line that we re all middle class now Hanley examines class aspiration and social mobility through the lens of her own life providing a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham and make her way against the odds through sixth form college university and on into the world of professional journalismReceived wisdom tells us social mobility is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society Yet changing class can be a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get onWritten and read by Lynsey HanleyAbridged by Sian PreeceProduced by Kirsteen Cameronhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9 Her Small-Town Hero years ago and with it the idea of aspiration of social mobility which received wisdom tells us is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society as a whole Yet for the many millions who experience it changing class is like emigrating from one side of From BBC radio 4 Book of the WeekJournalist Lynsey Hanley s personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades25 I can draw an outline of the landscape that shaped us with words such as Nice biscuits pornography underpasses 2p bus fares Hanley s childhood spanned the 1980s when she discovered early on the joys and consolations of music and gained political awareness by observing the ways in which different newspapers covered the Miners Strike 35 Growing up in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham she found school to be a mostly disappointing experience Instead she found solace in the local library and gained knowledge through the pages of music magazines and broadsheet newspapers 45 In this episode Hanley looks at the process of applying for university and of how many students make educational decisions based on their backgrounds old universities for the middle class new for the working class limiting potential advantages for the latter55 In this final episode she looks at the divisive notion encouraged by politicians of all parties over the past two decades that we re all middle class nowChanging class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other where Red Tail (Travis Trilogy you have to rescind Promises in Tumble Creek your old passport learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if Mischief and Marriage you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of Cold Case, Hot Accomplice (Men of Wolf Creek, your old life even if they are the relationships and things that are dearest to Blackmailed Into the Greek Tycoons Bed (International Billionaires, your heartClass is a subject we re all aware of but rarely talk about aside from the insidious line that we re all middle class now Hanley examines class aspiration and social mobility through the lens of her own life providing a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood a vast council estate near Birmingham and make her way against the odds through sixth form college university and on into the world of professional journalismReceived wisdom tells us social mobility is an uneuivocally positive phenomenon for individuals and for society Yet changing class can be a lonely anxious psychologically disruptive process which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get onWritten and read by Lynsey HanleyAbridged by Sian PreeceProduced by Kirsteen Cameronhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9


10 thoughts on “Respectable

  1. says:

    I was predisposed to regard Lynsey Hanley’s book favourably having very much enjoyed her previous work Estates and finding that we had a similar background albeit separated by a decade or so While Hanley was raised on the Chelmsley Wood coun

  2. says:

    While reading ‘Respectable’ I couldn’t help contemplating how I would write my own version as I’ve sometimes considered doing Like Hanley I spend uite a lot of time thinking about the British class system and its influence on my childhood and education My background is markedly different to Hanley’s but I have a similar sense of having experienced life in multiple parts of the class hierarchy while feeling slightly set apart from

  3. says:

    BOTWhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb0785nl9Description Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class i

  4. says:

    Very readable and therefore I got through it faster than I expected but also I found a lot in common in terms of life experiences background and trajectory so it was gripping and deeply thought provoking I've always had the sense of running away from my upbringing to a better life of my own making and in recent years be

  5. says:

    From BBC radio 4 Book of the WeekJournalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades25 I can draw an outline of the landscape that shaped us with words such as Nice biscuits pornography underpasses 2p bus fares Hanley's childhood spanned the 1980s; when she discovered early on the joys and consolations of music and gained political awareness by observing the

  6. says:

    The premise of this book is a very interesting one and it's very definitely a book that makes you think I'm not sure whether it's about class or social mobility I think that both of those topics are big enough for a book of

  7. says:

    A very readable combination of the author's autobiographical reminiscences of growing up as 'respectable' working class on a Birmingham council estate with academic analysis of class divisions in British societyIt's a pity it was published too early to include any analysis of the Brexit vote

  8. says:

    BBC Radio 4 Book of the Book interesting historical and locality reminiscences well written

  9. says:

    SuperbA moving touching and funny account of social mobility Hugely thought provoking; a great read I could not put it do

  10. says:

    “Our culture contains many silent symbols powerful than money It contains keys that can’t be bought which gain access to rooms whose existence you can barely imagine unless you get to enter them Social and cultural capital works on a compound interest model the you have the you get The knowledge and influence you accrue the you get to know other people with knowledge and influence and the knowledge and influence you acuire to